What core strength?

iStock_000007691776SmallIf you’d asked me – before I took this class last week that totally kicked my butt – how much core strength I thought I had, I would have given you the so-so hand gesture while praying you weren’t going to ask me to prove it.

I really did think my core strength was so-so, not great, but not terrible.  Then I went to SculptWorks, a class at the local YogaWorks taught by an NASM-certified instructor. The NASM (National Academy of Sports Medicine) bit is important because their approach to exercise assures that you burn as many calories as humanly possible with every movement.

Turns out my core strength is zip.  Turns out sitting on a stability ball at work all day isn’t enough. And that instructor? She seemed like a really nice person but I was sore for literally 5 days after one 60-minute class. I was so depressed, but the experience was motivating so I started reading up on the significance of core training.

In an article by NASM staff, it says that core training works to increase movement efficiency by firing the small spinal and hip muscles, which helps control unwanted movement during activities and protect the spine. So that’s why I was so sore. I didn’t even know these muscles existed!

Strengthening your core can help you avoid injuries, and I don’t know about you but I need all the help I can get. Considering that about 80 percent of the population suffers from back pain or discomfort, and 60 percent of work-related injuries involve the core, you might do yourself a big favor by starting to pay more attention to your core.

So that’s what I’m doing, and now I have a plan: use the tools I have available to me, including the NASM OPT-based exercise programming inside the dotFIT Me Program, and get my butt back to that class!

Article link: http://www.dotfit.com/shop/article.aspx?atid=108